Loevy & Loevy attorneys head to O'Hare International Airport to aid those effected by Trump's executive order banning refugees and restricting immigration.

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After spending nearly a quarter-century behind bars for a murder he says he did not commit, Shawn Whirl's conviction is the latest in Cook County to dissolve under claims of a coerced confession.

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Shawn Whirl, who alleges he confessed to murder because of torture by a Chicago police detective is likely to walk out of prison a free man after more than 24 years behind bars.

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Jermaine Walker filed a federal lawsuit against the Chicago police and the state's attorney investigator who allegedly planted drugs and perjured themselves. This came after Judge Catherine Haberkorn threw out his conviction and order Walker immediately released after nearly a decade in prison.

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Daniel Taylor, a man who spent two decades in prison for a double murder despite being in custody at the time, filed a federal lawsuit alleging that Chicago police coerced a confession and manufactured evidence

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Taylor alleges in a federal lawsuit he spent two decades in prison for a double murder he didn’t commit because Chicago police detectives buried evidence that he was locked up at the time of the slayings.

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A Cook County Judge ruled that the Chicago Police Department must turn over records involving its use of a secret cellphone tracking system as part of an ongoing open-records lawsuit filed by Freddy Martinez, a local activist.

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Cook County Circuit Judge Catherine Haberkorn threw out the evidence in the felony trial of Joseph Sperling after the defense submitted a video of the encounter that showed the officers involved had not followed the correct stop and search procedures.

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The Glenview Board of Fire and Police Commissioners has fired Glenview police officer James Horn, after being charged with lying on the stand during the 2014 drug trial of Joseph Sperling.

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The family of Donte Sowell has filed a lawsuit alleging that he was shot without justification by members of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department.

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Midwest Medical Records Association Inc. and plaintiffs Walter Solon and Cynthia Zaletel have reached a $2.2 million settlement to partially refund law firms who were overcharged for digital records between 2001 and 2007.

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Plaintiff's attorneys weigh in on the the Chicago Law Department's tendency to withhold potential evidence or otherwise hinder discovery requests in federal civil rights lawsuits against Chicago police officers.

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During the 20 years he spent in prison for a murder he didn't commit, Rodell Sanders taught himself law and wrote the court filings that eventually won him a new trial. With the help of attorneys from the University of Chicago's Exoneration Project, Sanders was acquitted by a Cook County Jury, and is now pursuing both a certificate of innocence and a lawsuit against the Chicago Heights Police Department.

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Professor Steven Salaita, whose job offer at the University of Illinois was withdrawn after he made anti-Israel comments on social media, has filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging breach of contract and violation of his free speech rights.

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The University of Illinois should offer a job to controversial scholar Steven Salaita, who was denied an appointment by the Urbana-Champaign campus last year due to his anti-Israel Tweets.

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Until District Attorney Ismael Ozanne announces whether Officer Matt Kenny will face criminal charges for the March 6 shooting of 19-year-old Tony Robinson, questions remain.

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Matt Kenny – a Madison, WI police officer who killed Tony Robinson Jr., an unarmed black man – will not face criminal charges, District Attorney Ismael Ozanne said Tuesday, citing Mr. Robinson Jr.'s erratic behavior, including assault.

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In a federal lawsuit against the officers and agencies involved in Juan Rivera's wrongful conviction, Mr. Rivera's attorneys allege police planted evidence.

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Publications now can be sent directly to inmates in Kenosha County's detention facilities after the county agreed to change its policy following a federal lawsuit regarding the First Amendment rights of those incarcerated.

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A wrongful death lawsuit brought by the family of Darius Pinex which helped bring about a review of the city’s Law Department has been settled before a scheduled retrial.

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A Cicero police officer named Donald Garrity; who stands accused in a lawsuit of shooting Cesar Munive in the back and killing him; has requested a disability pension because he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder after the shooting.

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Prosecutors have formally dropped murder charges against Jack MucCullough, the man convicted in what had been dubbed the nation’s oldest cold case to go to trial.

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The Chicago Police Department is being sued to turn over records regarding any purchases of cellular tracking equipment, whose use is under scrutiny by privacy activists.

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A federal jury deliberates over whether former Chicago Police officer and freed Death Row inmate Steve Manning deserves more than $20 million in damages after he accused two FBI agents of framing him.

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Kevin Majors, the former CTA bus supervisor who believes he was unfairly stripped of his retirement pension for publicly criticizing the agency’s bus service, is slated to finally get his benefits.

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Equipment failure and lax record-keeping plague Cook County's police surveillance program.

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Years after Marcus Lyon's conviction was vacated and his lawsuit alleging police misconduct filed, authorities have genetically linked another man to the rape which sent Lyons to prison for three years.

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After Curtis Lovelace's first trial ended in a hung jury, The Exoneration Project, led by Jon Loevy, joined the defense team and is now moving for a bond reduction.

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Chicago police are reviewing how long officers can hold and interrogate suspects without bringing them before a judge, a key issue in the civil rights lawsuit against the city brought by Joseph Lopez, who contends that police held him for five days before charges were dropped.

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Fourteen people have filed sworn statements in federal court alleging that Chicago police mistreated them in interrogation sessions lasting two or more days as part of an attempt to expand the federal lawsuit filed by Joseph Lopez into a class action.

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For the first time in two decades, Jon Burge will be called to testify (via videoconferencing from federal prison) in Alton Logan's lawsuit against him alleging that he and detectives under his command concealed exculpatory evidence from Logan's lawyer and Cook County prosecutors.

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Chicago aldermen gave preliminary approval Tuesday for nearly $33 million in settlements regarding two police misconduct cases — one filed on behalf of Christina Eilman, and the other filed by Alton Logan.

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John Koranda, the brother of a victim in the 2003 North Side porch collapse, accused the Daley administration in a federal lawsuit of partially blaming him in order to hide its own misconduct.

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James Kluppelberg spent nearly 25 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit after allegedly being beaten into confessing. He was granted a certificate of innocence by a Cook County judge who called the ordeal an “injustice,” according to his attorneys.

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Law firm Loevy & Loevy teamed up with the University of Chicago Law School in 2007 to start the Exoneration Project, whose work resulted in the release of James Kluppelberg and the dismissal of all charges against him. This success is part of a wider legacy in Illinois of lawyers teaming up with universities and various innocence projects in order to exonerate wrongfully convicted individuals.

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Tripped up by whistleblower Ryan Keiser, McHugh Construction has agreed to pay $12 million in fines to resolve a case involving alleged fraud on government programs intended to benefit women and minority-owned subcontractors.

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Jane Kasper, a Chicago police officer, alleges she was the victim of false arrest, imprisonment, and torture at the hands of fellow officers after she called the police during an argument with her brother.

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Michael Kanovitz, an attorney with the civil rights firm Loevy & Loevy, is representing two whistleblowers in a lawsuit against former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, who allegedly authorized the policies that allowed their torture at a U.S. military prison in Iraq after they alerted U.S. officials to suspected illegal activity by their employer, an Iraqi security company.

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Despite being granted parole more than twenty years after the now highly controversial conviction that landed him in prison, Lebrew Jones has never actually been cleared of the murder charges, which to this day make him virtually unemployable and often destitute. His new lawyer Anand Swaminathan, of the Chicago civil rights law firm Loevy and Loevy has taken on the challenge of overturning his conviction.

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The family of Gregory Jones filed a federal lawsuit alleging that police fabricated a story about a car chase to justify their speeding 20 miles over the limit through a Humboldt Park neighborhood when they struck both 11-year-old Datondra Mitchell, injuring her, and the 8-year-old Jones, who later died.

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Following the deposition of witnesses to the unmarked police car that struck and killed 8-year-old Gregory Jones and seriously injured 11-year-old Datondra Mitchell, several inconsistencies in the police reports suggest a possible cover-up on the part of the city to protect Officers Jackson and Del Boccio from accusations of reckless driving and breaking police protocol.

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On behalf of former Proviso West boys basketball assistant coach Michael Johnson, a federal lawsuit has been filed against the Proviso School District 209 Board of Education and others alleging a violation of Johnson's first amendment rights. Johnson was fired shortly after raising concerns about former basketball coach Chris Head's physical and verbal abuse toward players and some of their family members.

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A federal jury awarded a record $21 million to Juan Johnson, who spent more than a decade in prison after being wrongfully convicted of murder.

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Chicago police sergeant Edward Howard Jr. was charged with aggravated battery and official misconduct for allegedly slapping 19-year-old Gregory Jeffries while the teen was already handcuffed.

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Retired Chicago police Detective Michael Kill will testify in the hearing meant to determine whether Anthony Jakes' allegations against him regarding torture and coercion will result in Jakes' 1993 murder conviction being overturned.

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22 years after his testimony helped send South Side teenager Anthony Jakes to prison for murder, retired Chicago police Detective Michael Kill was back on a witness stand as part of an ongoing hearing to decide whether Jakes' 1993 conviction should be overturned.

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Lawyers for Darnell Foxx and Javell Ivory have asked that the two men be resentenced for their involvement in a drive-by shooting that killed two people and injured two others following the Supreme Court ruling that mandatory life sentences without parole for juvenile offenders are unconstitutional.

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In a lawsuit filed by the Loevy & Loevy law firm on behalf of government watchdog group Better Government Association; the IHSA should be subject to the Illinois Freedom of Information Act because it functions as a public body.

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Craig Huffman, a former official in Barack Obama’s U.S. Senate campaign, has filed a federal lawsuit accusing Chicago police of improperly arresting him on charges he sexually assaulted a hostess at a restaurant in the Gold Coast neighborhood.

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After spending more than two decades in prison for a crime he didn't commit — and then another month fighting for his exoneration following Gov. Pat Quinn's commutation of his sentence — Tyrone Hood's conviction was finally vacated with the help of his lawyers.

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Tyrone Hood, who served 22 years for a crime he maintains he did not commit, has been granted clemency by Gov. Pat Quinn, as one of the governor's last acts in office.

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First, two Genoa police officers shot Dellace Holten Jr. as he cowered inside a car last May. Then, they lied to investigators and tampered with evidence.

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A federal lawsuit filed Thursday claims officials at the Lake County Jail never took an inmate to see a judge in the 16 days he was there and let him die from dehydration.

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One of four Death Row inmates pardoned by Gov. George Ryan before he left office in January filed a federal lawsuit Thursday accusing Chicago police of torturing and framing him for setting a 1987 fire that killed seven people, including his wife and infant son.

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In what plaintiffs see as a small victory, U.S. Magistrate Judge Geraldine Soat Brown ordered that Area 2 police detectives submit to depositions in a civil case filed by freed Death Row inmate Madison Hobley.

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Another Chicago man is suing police over allegations of torture. 33 year old Harold Hill says in 1992 he was beaten and forced to confess to a murder he didn’t commit. He was exonerated on DNA evidence in 2005.

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To settle a wrongful-conviction lawsuit against the Chicago police, the city recently agreed to pay Harold Hill $1.25 million.

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A man who spent more than 12 years in prison before DNA testing cleared him of rape and murder charges has sued Chicago police, saying he was forced to confess falsely to the 1990 slaying of Kathy Morgan on the South Side.

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Chicago Police are accused of offering a crooked “get out of jail free” card. The catch? A woman says she was told to plant a gun for it. Now the city has paid her $50,000 in a settlement, and the cops have been suspended without pay. CBS 2’s Suzanne Le Mignot explains.

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A federal jury Monday ordered a former police officer and the McHenry County town he once served to pay $450,000 to a Wisconsin man he was accused of beating in an off-duty bar brawl.

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A McHenry County grand jury indicted two police officers and a former police officer Thursday in the beating of a man Feb. 20 near Fox Lake. "They're supposed to protect us from violence, and here they're perpetrating violence," said State's Atty. Lou Bianchi.

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Days after Chicago police promoted their expanded training for dealing with people with autism, a teen with the disorder was allegedly struck by an officer who ignored the family’s pleas that he was a “special boy.”

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Police thought Oscar Guzman may have been a suspect they were searching for. The 16-year-old's family says the special needs teen was confused when two officers tried to ask him questions. The Guzman family says Oscar did nothing wrong when he was hit on the head. Monday's lawsuit is a civil rights suit filed in federal court.

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Chicago Police Officer Jerome Finnigan and fellow Special Operations Section members have faced repeated allegations that they burst into homes without warrants, ransacked them and stole cash, jewelry and other valuables.

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In 1995, Mather football star Yarmo Green was convicted of attempted first-degree murder of one person and aggravated battery of another and sentenced to 40 years in prison.

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A man freed after spending more than a decade wrongly imprisoned for murder has sued Aurora, alleging police manipulated evidence that resulted in his conviction.

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A man exonerated of murder after spending 11 years in prison has been given the go-ahead to pursue a lawsuit against aurora police officers he maintains withheld evidence and coerced him into giving a false confession. In a written opinion this week, U.S. District Judge Virginia M. Kendall declined to throw out Jonathan Grayson’s civil rights suit.

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At the time 14-year-old Adam Gray was arrested for setting a fire that killed two people, the evidence that the fire had been intentionally set seemed unassailable. After all, fire investigators testified that the March 1993 blaze at a Brighton Park neighborhood two-flat had the markings of an arson: shiny “alligator” charring on the wood porch stairs and deep burn patterns across the first-floor landing.

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A federal jury has awarded $200,000 to a Chicago man who charged United Airlines with race, sex and age discrimination after he was dismissed as a flight attendant in 1997.

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A federal judge has thrown out parts of the city's Disorderly Conduct Ordinance following a challenge by anti-war protesters, attorneys said. In ruling on a lawsuit filed by two people arrested while leafleting at the Taste of Chicago in 2006, U.S. District Judge John O'Grady ruled that parts of the ordinance were unconstitutional due to their vagueness.

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A Riverdale man alleges in a federal lawsuit that his girlfriend’s attempt to do a good deed by returning a cell phone found in an alley turned into a nightmare where police framed him for a robbery.

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Two North Side men who were handcuffed and held in jail for three days and charged with multiple counts of aggravated battery, will learn today whether the city council will approve a settlement of $197,000, as offered by the city’s law department.

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A federal jury awarded more than $2 million Tuesday to a man who claimed he was falsely arrested and charged with attempted child abduction.

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Gov. Rod Blagojevich on Thursday pardoned four Chicago men of crimes ranging from rape to murder, calling their wrongful convictions “tragic.” The four--Michael Evans, Paul Terry, Dana Holland and LaFonso Rollins--had each spent between 10 and 27 years in prison for crimes they did not commit. All were exonerated after DNA testing.

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A federal jury in Chicago awarded $4.2 million Thursday to a West Side couple whose infant was taken into protective custody for more than 8 months after two Chicago detectives allegedly “lied” to state investigators, the couple’s attorney said.

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Three Chicago men sued the city Thursday, charging that police officers inhumanely and unlawfully held them for questioning in poorly equipped interrogation rooms, a practice they equated to torture.

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A Harvey deputy marshal helped a detective rob and beat two men from the south suburb days before the marshal was arrested in a holdup on Chicago’s West Side, according to a lawsuit.

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The city is poised to pay $415,000 to a woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by two then-Chicago police officers after the bought her liquor and drove her back to her Rogers Park apartment to play strip poker while on duty.

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Cook County prosecutors said Thursday that they have reopened their investigation into the rape and murder of a suburban girl 20 years ago, after defense lawyers said DNA testing done last month linked a convicted rapist to the crime.

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Five south suburban men who were wrongfully convicted of murder while they were teenagers have filed a federal lawsuit alleging crooked cops framed them.

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Adolfo Davis lived in a crawl space with dirt floors and was raised by a loving but illiterate grandmother who struggled to meet his most basic needs, like cooking or doing laundry, according to a grim picture that emerged at the Chicago man’s resentencing.

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It had been nearly a decade since Keith Cooper last set eyes on his wife and three children. Sentenced to 40 years in prison for a 1996 robbery in a small Indiana community that ended in bloodshed, Cooper tried within the concrete walls of his cell to clear his name, as he watched his children grow up through photographs.

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As Mike Pence cultivates a national image as Donald Trump’s running mate, abandoning a re-election bid for a second term as Indiana governor in the process, he may leave unanswered a historic pardon request involving the wrongful conviction of an Illinois man.

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Two separate settlements totaling almost $60 million were approved between November 2010 and January 2011 for Cook County, Illinois jail prisoners who were strip searched before being released. Both settlements stemmed from federal court cases filed under 42 U.S.C. 1983, one in 2004 and the other in 2006.

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Hours after the fatal shooting of the driver of an Oldsmobile Aurora, two Chicago police officers assigned to one of the city’s most dangerous neighborhoods explained to investigators why they had pulled the car over early that morning and approached with their guns drawn.

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Some type of settlement has been reached in a lawsuit filed by an Indiana Department of Correction inmate against the city of Lafayette and one of its police officers.

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Dana Holland and Christopher Coleman became friends in a downstate prison cell where, through the iron bars and the nearby windows, they could see the Mississippi River and its suggestion of freedom.

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A federal jury late Tuesday held two Chicago police officers liable for the unreasonable search of a man who alleged that the officers sodomized him with a screwdriver during a search for drugs.

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A 22-year-old woman who was allegedly raped by two on-duty Chicago police officers filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday alleging a “widespread practice” of abuse within the department that goes largely unpunished.

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Citing the public’s interest in shielding whistleblowers from retaliation, a federal judge Monday threw out a counterclaim filed against a man who accused his employer of defrauding the government.

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Carl Chatman is the man who was convicted for raping a woman in the Daley Center on May 24, 2002. He was picked up six blocks from the crime scene and 15 hours later dictated a confession that was handwritten by a prosecutor.

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From the moment Carl Chatman was arrested in a clerk's rape at the Daley Center in May 2002, doubts existed about his guilt. No forensic evidence connected Chatman to the crime, and officials could not explain how he had slipped out of the building undetected.

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The families of two men killed in separate shootings last year by Chicago police officers filed wrongful death lawsuits against the city and Police Department in federal court Thursday, saying their loved ones were gunned down unjustifiably.

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If two civil suits filed late Wednesday are successful, illegal rectal searches and strip searches by Milwaukee police could cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages and legal bills.

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A veteran Chicago attorney says he is representing a young man shown on video in the backseat of a Chicago police SUV.

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CHESTER, Ill.—Imprisoned for life for a double killing after what he said was a coerced confession, Eric Caine spent years behind bars quietly wishing he had been condemned to death instead.

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Hours after the Chicago City Council signed off on a $10 million payout to settle his lawsuit, a somber Eric Caine stood in his lawyer's Near West Side office Wednesday surrounded by relatives of other alleged victims of police misconduct.

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CHESTER, Ill.- After 25 years behind bars, Eric Caine walked out from behind the stark stone walls of Menard Correctional Center a free man Thursday, all smiles in the warm sun.

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A Chicago man freed a year ago after DNA cleared him of a rape for which he spent 12 years in prison has alleged in a federal lawsuit that he was framed by Chicago police.

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Three men were crossing a North Side street in January when a car allegedly blew through a stop sign and almost hit them. Jacob Butko yelled something and made an obscene gesture at the car, prompting its occupants - two plainclothes police officers - to jump out and severely beat Butko and his friends, a federal lawsuit alleged Thursday.

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An officer the Chicago Police Department tried to fire for punching an elderly man in the face after a fender-bender is now accused of doing nothing while fellow cops beat up bar patrons in January.

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A former Chicago Police detective who allegedly witnessed former Cmdr. Jon Burge play "Russian roulette" with a suspect and put a typewriter cover over the man's head is expected to be a key prosecution witness in Burge's upcoming trial, the Chicago SunTimes has learned.

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The former president of the New York Stock Exchange and a pair of prominent software developers suffered a courtroom defeat Tuesday in a long-running business dispute with a veteran of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange trading floor.

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The brother of a man beaten by a Streamwood police officer says he pleaded with the officer to stop striking his brother, and saw no reason for the attack.

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As Ronald Bell crouched on his hands and knees on his driveway, the Streamwood police officer started whaling away with his metal baton, striking Bell on his back.

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At his trial on drug charges nearly a decade ago, Ben Baker told a seemingly fur-fetched tale about a corrupt band of Chicago police officers who ran a South Side public housing development like their own criminal fiefdom, stealing narcotics proceeds, shaking down dealers for protection money and pinning cases on those who refused to play ball.

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The case of a South Side man framed by crooked Chicago Police officers, wrongfully imprisoned for a decade and finally released this week when charges were dropped, is an indictment of the entire Chicago Police Department, the man's civil rights attorneys charged on Friday.

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Ben Baker had long been a thorn in the side of corrupt Chicago police Sgt Ronald Watts, who framed the part-time drug dealer on a narcotics charge in retaliation for refusing to pay a protection payoff of $1,000, court records show.

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By Thursday afternoon, Ben Baker's legal team had known for nearly 24 hours that his efforts to beat charges put on him more than a decade ago by a now convicted Chicago police officer had paid off and he was going home.

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A man who spent 27 years in prison for the 1980 slaying of his childhood friend was exonerated Thursday of criminal charges in the case.

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