Steve Art is a partner at Loevy & Loevy. He joined the firm in September 2011.

Since joining Loevy & Loevy, Steve has helped to secure millions of dollars in verdicts and settlements for his clients. His practice is focused on wrongful convictions, deaths in jails and prisons, police shootings, and other violations of the Constitution.

Steve graduated from Northwestern University School of Law, magna cum laude and Order of the Coif, in 2009. During law school, he served as Executive Articles Editor of the Northwestern University Law Review, and won the Julius H. Miner Moot Court Competition, the Raoul Berger Prize in writing, the Lowden-Wigmore Prize, and Senior Research Honors. At Northwestern University, Steve worked on wrongful convictions and international human rights cases in the Bluhm Legal Clinic, he served as an officer of the American Constitution Society and the Public Interest Law Group, and he was a member of the Public Service Honor Roll. He was also a judicial extern to the Honorable Mark Filip of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

Following law school, Steve served as law clerk to the Honorable Diane P. Wood of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit during the court’s 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 Terms. In addition to that appellate experience, Steve has written numerous merits briefs in the U.S. Courts of Appeals and amicus briefs and petitions for certiorari in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Steve is a member of the board of the Chicago Council of Lawyers, and until October 2018 served as president of the Chicago Appleseed Fund for Justice. He also serves as a member of the Criminal Justice Committee of Chicago Appleseed and the Chicago Council of Lawyers, and he is a founding member of the Justice Council of the Center on Wrongful Convictions. In 2016, Steve was recognized at Northwestern’s Annual Public Service Benefit Dinner for his contributions to public interest law. In the past, Steve has been a volunteer for the Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, the ACLU of Illinois, and Cabrini Green Legal Aid. Before becoming a lawyer, Steve worked in the music industry in Chicago.

Bar Admissions

• Illinois, 2010
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, 2011
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, 2013
• U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, 2011
• U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, 2012

Northwestern University School of Law, Chicago, Illinois
• J.D. (magna cum laude) – 2009
• Order of the Coif
• Dean’s list

The University of Chicago
• A.B. – 2003
• With Honors
• Dean’s list

Clerkships & Past Employment

• Law Clerk, Hon. Diane P. Wood, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

Publications

An Empirical Examination of Universal Jurisdiction for Piracy (with Eugene Kontorovich), American Journal of International Law, Vol. 104, No. 3, 2008

The Meaning of the Seventeenth Amendment and a Century of State Defiance (with Zachary Clopton), Northwestern University Law Review, Vol. 107, No. 3, 2013

Fields v. City of Chicago, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Trial counsel for Nathson Fields, who was wrongfully convicted and sentenced to death for a double murder he did not commit as a result of alleged police misconduct. Jury returned a $22 million verdict for Mr. Fields, among the highest jury verdicts in a wrongful conviction case in U.S. history.

Rivera v. Lake County, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Litigation counsel for Juan Rivera, who was wrongfully convicted of a murder he did not commit and spent 20 years in prison as a result of alleged police misconduct. Case settled for $20 million, the largest individual, pretrial settlement of a wrongful conviction case in U.S. history.

Rivera v. Guevara, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Trial counsel for Jacques Rivera, who was wrongfully convicted of a murder he did not commit and spent 21 years in prison as a result of alleged police misconduct. Jury returned a $17 million verdict for Mr. Rivera.

Burgess v. Baltimore Police Department, et al. (U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland) Litigation counsel for Sabein Burgess, who was wrongfully convicted of a murder he did not commit and spent 19 years in prison as a result of alleged police misconduct. Jury returned a $15 million verdict for Mr. Burgess.

Fox v. Barnes, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Trial counsel for Ray Fox in civil rights lawsuit alleging that deliberate indifference by prison officials to Mr. Fox’s medical needs resulted in serious brain injuries. Jury returned a $12 million verdict for Mr. Fox, among the highest deliberate indifference verdicts in U.S. history.

Awalt v. Marketti, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Trial counsel for estate of a man who died at a county jail as a result of alleged denial of medication and medical treatment during a five-day pretrial detention. Case settled following trial for multiple millions of dollars.

Julian v. Hanna, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana) Litigation counsel for man wrongfully convicted of arson as a result of alleged police misconduct. On appeal of a motion to dismiss, won unanimous reversal in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Judge Richard A. Posner’s opinion in the case is the first in the Seventh Circuit to recognize a federal claim of malicious prosecution. Case settled before trial for $3 million.

Manuel v. City of Joliet, et al. (U.S. Supreme Court) Appellate counsel with amicus curiae Albert W. Alschuler in a case examining whether an individual’s Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable seizure continues beyond legal process so as to allow a malicious prosecution claims based upon the Fourth Amendment. Professor Alschuler’s amicus brief is here.

Kingsley v. Hendrickson (U.S. Supreme Court) Appellate counsel for amici curiae former corrections administrators and experts in support of the Petitioner in a case examining what showing pretrial detainees must make to demonstrative the use of excessive force in violation of the Constitution. The amicus brief filed on behalf of our clients is cited by the Supreme Court in its opinion in favor of Petitioner.

Salaita v. Kennedy, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Litigation counsel for Professor Steven Salaita, who alleges that he was fired from a tenured position at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in violation of his constitutional rights and his rights under state law. Case pending.

Doe v. Cook County, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Counsel for Earl Dunlap, the court-appointed Transitional Administrator of the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center, for all issues arising from Mr. Dunlap’s efforts to reform and monitor the JTDC.

Illinois v. Oduwole (Illinois Supreme Court & Appellate Court of Illinois) Appellate counsel for man prosecuted in Illinois based on charges that he attempted to make a terrorist threat. Working with attorneys from the Bluhm Legal Clinic at Northwestern University School of Law, obtained a unanimous appellate court decision reversing Mr. Oduwole’s conviction on the ground that the State had failed to present sufficient evidence of an attempt. Case was voted “Best Exculpation” in Slate‘s First Annual Crime Awards.

Vance and Ertel v. Rumsfeld (U.S. Supreme Court) Appellate counsel for civilian American citizens who alleged that they were detained and tortured by U.S. military officials in Iraq. Drafted petition for certiorari in the U.S. Supreme Court.