Mark Reyes (Loevy-Reyes) graduated from Cornell Law School in 1992. He was and still is involved with the Latino Law Student Association there.

Throughout his career as a lawyer, Mark has litigated cases in multiple jurisdictions with a focus on justice for clients and to serve the public good. He has been an attorney at Loevy & Loevy from 2004-2010 and 2015-present. Mark’s work at Loevy & Loevy focuses on representing clients whose rights have been violated by law enforcement (including excessive force, wrongful imprisonment, and prisoner rights) or schools (including gender discrimination and sexual misconduct). Before joining Loevy & Loevy, Mark was a disability rights lawyer in Vermont. He also served as a municipal lawyer for the City of Chicago. Mark has argued appeals before the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and the Vermont Supreme Court.

After representing students as an attorney at Loevy & Loevy, Mark took a leave from the firm between 2010-2015 to obtain his Masters in Education from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in order to teach at schools in disadvantaged communities. Since he returned to Loevy & Loevy, Mark continues to work with students and teaches education law to graduate students. Mark has served on the boards of civil rights, educational, and disability rights organizations.

Bar Admissions
• Illinois
• New York
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
• U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
• U.S. District Court for the Central District of Illinois
• U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont
• U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio

Cornell Law School

  • J.D. 1992

University of Massachusetts at Amherst

  • M.Ed. 2011

• McSorley v. Correctional Medical Services (N.D. Ill) Lead litigation and trial counsel in a denial of medical care case in which Mr. McSorley was denied medical care in jail for painful burns. After jury selection and opening statements, the parties agreed to settle the case.

 Dominguez v. Hendley (N.D. Ill) Trial counsel and lead litigation counsel in a wrongful conviction case in which police used an unduly suggestive lineup and suppressed evidence, which led to Plaintiff being imprisoned as a teenager. DNA evidence exonerated Mr. Dominguez, and a jury returned a verdict of over $9 million in favor of Mr. Dominguez.

Grant v. Blake (N.D. Ill) Trial counsel and lead litigation counsel in an excessive force case stemming from the fatal shooting of Cornelius Ware, who was shot in front of his family despite being unarmed and posing no danger to anyone. A jury determined that Chicago police used excessive force and the case settled for $5.25 million for Mr. Ware’s estate.

Finwall v. City of Chicago (N.D. Ill), Trial counsel and lead litigation counsel in a malicious prosecution case that involved an unduly suggestive lineup and suppressed evidence. A jury returned verdict of $2 million in favor of  Loevy & Loevy’s client

Booker v. City of Chicago (N.D. Ill) Trial counsel and lead litigation counsel in a deadly excessive force case in which Chicago police officers falsely claimed that Mr. Booker possessed two handguns and posed a danger. A jury found that the police used excessive force in shooting Mr. Booker and returned verdict of over $1.2 million in favor of  Loevy & Loevy’s client.

Slater v. Scott County (S.D. Iowa) Lead litigation and trial counsel in an excessive force case against jail officers who responded to Ms. Slater’s medical emergency by using force against her rather than provide her medical care. A jury returned a verdict imposing both individual and municipal (finding that Scott County’s policies were to blame for violating Ms. Slater’s rights) and the imposed compensatory and punitive damages.

E. v. Grindle  (N.D. Ill.), Trial counsel and lead litigation counsel in a gender discrimination/sexual misconduct case that resulted in a jury verdict against school officials, who were aware of a teacher’s sexual abuse but hid it. A jury awarded damages totaling more than $2 million to Loevy & Loevy’s eight clients and imposed a punitive damages award of $100,000 against a former school principal.

Armstrong v. Norsetter (W.D. Wis.) Lead litigation counsel in a wrongful conviction case caused by the destruction of forensic evidence, including DNA evidence. The case concluded in a confidential settlement.

Handley v. Straka (E.D. Pa.) Lead litigation counsel in a juvenile wrongful conviction case in which Mr. Handley, who was a teenager, was coerced to falsely confess to arson. The case concluded in a confidential settlement.