Prosecutors and Politics

The United States is the only country in the world that lets voters decide who will be their prosecutors. For the most part, those elections are foregone conclusions. Prosecutors run for election unopposed 85% of the time. The incumbent wins the election 95% of the time. But what happens when the voters buck this system… Read More

Journalist Sues to Get Police & State’s Attorney Records of Laquan McDonald Shooting Investigations

Laquan McDonald protest

CHICAGO — The independent journalist who forced the release of the infamous Laquan McDonald police shooting video has sued Chicago Police, the Independent Police Review Authority, and Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez to force release of their investigations into the police killing of the 17-year-old. The suits were filed on behalf of independent journalist… Read More

Police Perjury — All. The. Time.

Ever heard of police officers “testilying” in court? “Testilying” is the cynical euphemism that cops use for testifying falsely in order to secure convictions against people whom they believe to be guilty. But there is obviously another word for it: police perjury. “Testilying” is rationalized as somehow justified because the cop’s goal is to make… Read More

The Unbridled Power of the Prosecutor

  The prosecutor is one of the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system. Should the cop who gunned down that black child for no reason and then lied about it in his police reports be prosecuted for murder? It’s the prosecutor’s decision. The number of women in prison jumped 646% between 1980 and… Read More

Media Coverage of Black Shooting Victims (Part II): “Thugs” in the News Media

  In a recent post, Media Coverage of Black Shooting Victims (Part I), we considered how the media uses negative portrayals of black shooting victims to imply that police brutality against black victims is somehow justifiable. We explored how the news media’s use of mug shots or unflattering photos of the victims and its assassination… Read More

Rejecting the Police Cover Up

  By now, surely many have read or heard about the release of the gruesome dashboard camera videos of Chicago Police Department officer Jason Van Dyke shooting black teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times. But while mourning this brutal shooting, few are talking about the police cover up at the center of the story. The release… Read More

Loevy & Loevy Client Brandon Smith Wins Release of Laquan McDonald Shooting Videos

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Loevy & Loevy client Brandon Smith, an independent journalist from Chicago, recently secured a major victory under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act, requiring the City of Chicago to release video recordings of Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing teenager Laquan McDonald. Loevy & Loevy is proud to represent journalists and citizens in… Read More

Journalist, Attorney Respond to Mayor Emanuel’s Comments on Release of Police Shooting Video

November 13, 2015 – In a story date-lined 1:43 PM today, the Chicago Tribune reports that Mayor Emanuel commented on why the City of Chicago is still refusing to release police film of an officer shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald sixteen times in October 2014. The Tribune reports that Mayor Emanuel said that now is not… Read More

Police Shootings Covered-Up

As this country continues to watch horrific police shootings captured on videotape, it has been especially troubling to see efforts by police forces to hide the truth. It seems that if we are ever going to find a way to curb unjustified police shootings in general, and unjustified police violence against black men in particular,… Read More

Police Body Cameras: Effective Tool To Stop Police Misconduct?

With media attention focusing on police violence, many cities are looking to expand the use of police body cameras. Cities using body cameras hope that recording officers’ encounters with suspects will curb police brutality, make officers accountable for their excessive force, and provide everyone with more information about what happened. But the use of police… Read More