Falsely Jailed at Age 14, Man Sues Chicago Police After Losing 24 Years to Wrongful Imprisonment

14-year-old Adam Gray

Police Fabricated Evidence, Coerced a False Confession From the 14-Year-Old, & Intimidated Witnesses to Frame the Youth CHICAGO, April 12, 2018 – After spending his adolescence and almost entire adulthood wrongfully imprisoned, Adam Gray today filed a federal lawsuit against eight former Chicago police officers (or their estates), a former fire marshal and a former… Read More

Improving Juvenile Justice

This has been a big week for juvenile justice. First, the Supreme Court ruled that adults and children who were sentenced in their youth to mandatory life in prison without parole should be allowed to ask a court to reconsider their sentence. And second, President Obama banned putting incarcerated children in solitary confinement in federal… Read More

Girls in the Justice System

                                After all of the interest in our recent post Too Many Women in Prison, let’s take a look at where the female over-incarceration problem often starts—girls in the justice system. While youth arrests are generally declining, the rates for… Read More

Adolescent Brain Development

A court in Wisconsin recently ruled that two twelve-year-old girls who stabbed a friend nearly to death, in order to appease a fictional online horror character called Slender Man, should be tried as adults. If ever there was a crime that epitomizes a child doing a horribly stupid thing because her adolescent brain was not… Read More

Loevy & Loevy Argued Cook County’s First Resentencing Hearing of A Juvenile Offender Sentenced to Mandatory Life Without Parole

On April 13, 2015, in a groundbreaking case that guaranteed important rights for juveniles across Illinois, Loevy & Loevy attorney Rachel Steinback and Patricia Soung, a staff attorney and instructor at the Center for Juvenile Lay & Policy at Loyola Law School argued Cook County’s first resentencing hearing of a juvenile offender sentenced to a mandatory term… Read More

Three Years After Miller v. Alabama: Uncertainty Remains For the Hundreds of Juvenile Offenders Serving Life Sentences Without Parole

In Miller v. Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court held that life sentences without the possibility of parole (LWOP) for juvenile offenders violated the Eighth Amendment where the sentence fails to consider the defendant’s age and other characteristics related to “youth.” Going forward, it is clear that no juvenile will be subject to an LWOP sentence… Read More