Sarah Grady joined Loevy & Loevy in 2013. She leads the firm’s Prisoners’ Rights Project, which advocates for men and women locked up in jails, prisons, and detention centers across the country.

Sarah has dedicated her practice to ensuring that the rights of all incarcerated people are protected. She represents individuals and classes of individuals whose rights have been violated by public officials charged with safeguarding them. Sarah has litigated cases resulting in millions of dollars of compensation for her clients. She has also obtained injunctive relief to halt continuing denials of her clients’ constitutional rights. In addition, she has written numerous merits and amicus briefs addressing important issues pertaining to prisoners’ rights in the U.S. Supreme Court and Courts of Appeals.

Sarah graduated cum laude from Northwestern University School of Law in 2012. During law school, she worked on prisoners’ rights issues and litigated death penalty cases with the MacArthur Justice Center and Death Penalty Clinic at Northwestern University School of Law’s Bluhm Legal Clinic. Following her graduation, she served as
a law clerk to the Honorable Matthew F. Kennelly of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

 

Bar Admissions
• Illinois, 2013
• New York, 2015
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, 2014
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, 2017
• U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, 2018
• U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, 2013
• U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, 2014
• U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, 2014
• U.S. District Court for the Central District of Illinois, 2014
• U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois, 2015

Northwestern University School of Law, Chicago, Illinois
• J.D. Law & Social Policy Concentration, cum laude – 2012
• Northwestern Public Service Award winner, 2012
• Dean’s list

The University of Iowa
• B.A. English & Journalism, with honors – 2008
• National Merit Scholarship Recipient
• Dean’s list

 

Clerkships & Past Employment

• Law Clerk, Hon. Matthew F. Kennelly, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois

Publications

Civil Death Is Different: An Examination of a Post-Graham Challenge to Felon Disenfranchisement Under the Eighth Amendment, The Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Vol. 102, No. 2, 2012

 

Piercy v. Wilhelmi, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Litigation counsel for estate of Dale Piercy, who died at an Illinois prison following two weeks of medical neglect. Case against prison staff and medical care contractor settled for $2.3 million.

Ellis v. Pfister, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Central District of Illinois) Litigation counsel for estate of Terrance Jenkins, who was suffocated by prison staff at central Illinois prison. Case settled for $2 million.

Awalt v. Marketti, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Trial counsel for estate of Robert Awalt, who died at a county jail after being denied medication and medical treatment over the course of five days. Case settled following trial for multiple millions of dollars, and the district court approved counsel’s fee petition for more than $3.17 million.

Ramirez v. Young (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit) Appellate counsel for Darwin Ramirez in appeal focused on whether a monolingual Spanish speaker must comply with a grievance process available only in English. The Seventh Circuit issued this opinion in Mr. Ramirez’s favor, holding that administrative remedies are not available to prisoners when they are not informed about them in a language they understand.

Nicolas v. Berry, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois) Trial counsel for Osbaldo José-Nicolas, who was beaten by prison staff and ignored by medical staff at a southern Illinois prison. Jury returned a $252,100 verdict, including significant punitive damages.

Kingsley v. Hendrickson (U.S. Supreme Court) Appellate counsel for amici
curiae former corrections administrators and experts. Amici submitted a brief in support of a man whose appeal focused on what pretrial detainees must show to prove a violation of the Constitution for improper use of force. The amicus brief filed on behalf of our clients is cited by the Supreme Court in its opinion in favor of Petitioner.

Mizzoni v. Nevada (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit) Appellate counsel for Joseph Mizzoni in appeal focused on whether Mr. Mizzoni was entitled to due process before being sent to solitary confinement for 1.5 years. Appeal pending.

Doe v. Cook County, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Counsel for Earl Dunlap, the court-appointed Transitional Administrator of the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center, for all issues arising from Mr. Dunlap’s efforts to reform and monitor the JTDC.

Townsend v. Murphy (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit) Appellate counsel for Jacob Townsend in appeal focused on the meaning of “available” as used in the Prison Litigation Reform Act’s exhaustion requirement. The Eighth Circuit decided the appeal in Mr. Townsend’s favor, issuing this opinion finding that affirmative misconduct by prison staff rendered Mr. Townsend’s administrative remedies unavailable.

Ross v. Gossett, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois) Litigation counsel for putative class of men housed at four southern Illinois prisons who were subjected to an abusive and humiliating facility-wide search. Case pending.

Dobbey v. Weilding, et al. (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois) Class counsel for certified class of men housed at Stateville Correctional Center alleging unconstitutional conditions of confinement. Case pending.